What’s in a name?

Tradition of the Southern Arizona Architectural Style and Names of Red Hawk J6 Homes

With its rich history in mining and search for wealth, Southern Arizona is home to over 80 towns of the 1800’s (ghost towns). Each with its own history of determination, resilience  and intrigue The Southwest lives on in spirit and beauty and the riches that attracted the settlers of the 1800’s.

The building aesthetics of historic southwest architecture is characterized by heavy stucco walls and pitched metal roofs.

This style evolved in the desert southwest in response to the local climate and available materials. Warm summers interrupted by torrential monsoon rains and winters that produce occasional snow, called for strong roof forms that readily shed precipitation and the high ceilings that  encouraged passive ventilation and let hot air rise above the habitable space. The traditional, thick walls delayed the heat transfer of the day until the cool of night. In the winter, the walls radiated the gathered heat into the interior as the outside temperature fell.

Territorial
Sonoran
Southwest

The Territorial, Sonoran and Southwest Models pay homage to this historic architectural aesthetic yet use modern building technologies. The exterior walls are stuccoed over 2*6 insulated wood frame with insulation and gypsum board at the interior side. An occasional offset in the lower portion of the territorial exterior walls creates a visual accent and recalls the ‘guardapolvos’ or ‘dust guard’ bases seen in traditional Mexican architecture.

The homes may be appointed with an optional energy package that includes R 23 blow in in wall insulation, Rheem hybrid hot water, 16 seer heat pump air conditioning, and living pattern smart thermostats. All homes are solar ready to accept a solar array.

The Homes of Red Hawk at J6 are named after the wonderful towns and places that represent Southern Arizona’s past and a Red Hawk home comfortable in its historical surroundings.